Clevenger, Tec 4 James R.

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T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

T/4 James Richard Clevenger was born in Ohio, Iowa, on October 16, 1916, to Elmer Clevenger and Cra May Faidley-Clevenger, and had two brothers. At some point, the family moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, where they lived in Township 134. His parents divorced and his mother remarried.  It is not known when, but he married Norma L. Dinsdale and joined the Minnesota National Guard’s tank company in Brainerd.

On February 10, 1941, he signed papers that transferred him from the Minnesota National Guard to the regular army with the rank of Private Firs Class. After this was done, the men were issued clothing, field equipment, and barracks baggage. They also were issued tick bags, to be filled with straw and serve as mattresses, on the bunks. Bunks were set up in the armory on the main drill floor, the stage, and the second floor of the armory. Their first meal as members of the army was pork and beans, boiled potatoes, bread and butter, cabbage salad, cheese, apple pie, and coffee. Sgt. Russell Swearingen had the job of inspecting the company’s tanks and other equipment which was being shipped to Ft. Lewis, Washington, ahead of the company.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

Next

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

Cabanatuan was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march were held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

In the camp, the prisoners continued to die, but at a slower rate. The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died. When a POW died, the POWs stripped him of his clothing, and the man was buried naked. The dead man’s clothing was washed in boiling water and given to a prisoner in need of clothing. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area.

After arriving in the camp James was put into the camp hospital. According to records kept by the POW medical staff at the camp, T/4 James R. Clevenger died on June 6, 1942, from dysentery, at approximately 6:00 A.M., and was buried in the camp cemetery. He was the 18th POWs to die in the camp.

In May or early June 1942, his parents received a message from the War Department

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger:

        “According to War Department records, you have been designated as the emergency addressee of Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, who, according to the latest information available, was serving in the  Philippine Islands at the time of the final surrender. 

        “I deeply regret that it is impossible for me to give you more information than is contained in this letter.  In the last days before the surrender of Bataan, there were casualties which were not reported to the War Department.  Conceivably the same is true of the surrender of Corregidor and possibly other islands of the Philippines.  The Japanese Government has indicated its intention of conforming to the terms of the Geneva Convention with respect to the interchange of information regarding prisoners of war.  At some future date, this Government will receive through Geneva a list of persons who have been taken prisoners of war.  Until that time the War Department cannot give you positive information. 

        “The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of surrender of Corregidor, May 7, 1942, until definite information to the contrary is received.  It is to be hoped that the Japanese Government will communicate a list of prisoners of war at an early date.  At that time you will be notified by this office in the event that his name is contained in the list of prisoners of war.  In the case of persons known to have been present in the Philippines and who are not reported to be prisoners of war by the Japanese Government, the War Department will continue to carry them as “missing in action” in the absence of information to the contrary, until twelve months have expired.  At the expiration of twelve months and in the absence of other information the War Department is authorized to make a final determination.

        “Recent legislation makes provision to continue the pay and allowances of persons carried in a “missing” status for a period not to exceed twelve months;  to continue, for the duration of the war, the pay and allowances of persons known to have been captured by the enemy; to continue allotments made by missing personnel for a period of twelve months and allotments or increase allotments made by persons by the enemy during the time they are so held;  to make new allotments or increase allotments to certain dependents defined in Public Law 490, 77th Congress.  The latter dependents generally include the legal wife, dependent children under twenty-one years of age and dependent mother, or such dependents as having been designated in official records.  Eligible dependents who can establish a need for financial assistance and are eligible to receive this assistance the amount allotted will be deducted from pay which would otherwise accrue to the credit of the missing individual.

                                                                                                                                                                    “Very Truly yours

                                                                                                                                                                            J. A. Ulio (signed) 
                                                                                                                                                                       Major General
                                                                                                                                                                   The Adjutant General”
 

His family received another message from the War Department. The following is an excerpt from it.

“The last report of casualties received by the War Department from the Philippines arrived early in the morning of May 6. Through this date, Technical Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger had not been reported as a casualty. The War Department will consider the persons serving in the Philippine Islands as “missing in action” from the date of the surrender of Corregidor, May 7, until definite information to the contrary is received.

“Efforts to secure prisoner of war lists from the Philippines have not been successful to this date due to the lack of communication and the fact that the Japanese Government has not yet given permission for the Swiss representative and the International Red Cross delegates to make visits to prisoner of war camps in the islands. When the lists of prisoners are received, we will clear the name of your son and send you any additional information that we may have.”

After this, his father heard nothing from the War Department for two years. Then on August 4, 1944, his father received a telegram from the War Department

“ELMER CLEVENGER
816 TENTH
BRAINERD

“=I AM DEEPLY DISTRESSED TO INFORM YOU REPORT JUST RECEIVED STATES THAT YOUR SON Technician FOURTH GRADE JAMES R CLEVENGER WHO PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN REPORTED A MISSING IN ACTION DIED SIXTH JUNE NINETEEN FORTY TWO AS A RESULT OF DYSENTERY PERIOD THE SECRETARY OF WAR ASKS THAT I EXPRESS HIS DEEP SYMPATHY IN YOUR LOSS AND HIS REGRET THAT THE UNAVOIDABLE CIRCUMSTANCES MADE NECESSARY THE UNUSUAL LAPSE OF TIME IN REPORTING YOUR SONS DEATH TO CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS=

           “ULIO THE ADJUTANT”

A number of days later, his father received the following letter.

“Dear Mr. E. Clevenger

    “It is with deep regret that I am writing to confirm the recent telegram informing you of the death of your son, Technician Fourth Grade James R. Clevenger, 20, 700, 225, infantry, who was previously reported a prisoner of war.

    “Information has now been received from the Japanese government through the International Red Cross stating that your son died on 6 June 1942 in a prisoner of war in the Philippine Islands from dysentery.

    “I realize the burden of anxiety that has been yours and deeply regret the sorrow this report brings you. May the knowledge that he made the supreme sacrifice for his home and country be a source of sustained comfort.

    “I extend to you my deepest sympathy,

                                                              Sincerely, yours
                                                              (signed) J. A. Ulio
                                                              Major General
                                                              The Adjutant General”

It also should be mentioned that his wife, Norma, gave birth to his son in 1942.

After the war, at the request of his family, T/4 James R. Clevenger was reburied at the  new American Military Cemetery at Manila, Philippine Islands, in Plot: H Row: 10 Grave: 12.

ClevengerJGr

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