San Fernando Scrap Metal Detail

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To get out of the camp he went out on a 100 man scrap metal detail of 500 men to San Fernando on May 11. There, the POWs lived in a Methodist school. The POWs picked up all the junk leftover from the battle. When they collected that, they began to recover all the vehicles that had been disabled before the surrender. To get the vehicles to Manila, where they were flattened before being loaded on ships – the POWs tied them together with ropes behind an operating vehicle. A POW sat in each vehicle and steered it as they were towed to San Fernando or Caloocan. Where other POWs worked as mechanics and attempted to get the vehicles running. If they did, the vehicles were sent to the Bachrach Garage for additional repairs. If they could not get the vehicles running, they were tied together again and taken to Manila as scrap metal. Before this was done, the POWs stripped the vehicles for parts.

While driving the vehicles, the POWs learned that if the brakes of any of the vehicles were quickly applied, it would stress the ropes and cause them to snap. The convoy then had to stop and retie the rope to the vehicle and continue the trip. The POWs quickly learned that the best time to do this was when the vehicles were approaching the town market of a barrio. If they timed it right, a rope would snap as they entered the market and the vehicles had to stop to reattach the rope. While this was done, the Filipinas came up to the POWs and gave them food without the guards interfering. Once the ropes were reattached, they were on their way.

During the spring of 1943, gasoline was being stolen that was used for operating vehicles used by the POWs. Eleven Filipinos were caught stealing gasoline by the Japanese. They were strung up by their thumbs with their toes barely touching the ground. The POWs were made to sit in front of the Filipinos on steps and the Japanese sat at tables. One Filipino was released and was beaten kicked, and cut. The more the Japanese drank, the worse it got. The POWs were forced to watch as pieces of wood were pushed into the men’s rectums. When he screamed the Japanese laughed. The Japanese did this to each of the Filipinos while the Americans were forced to watch. By morning, only three Filipinos were alive. Two of the Filipinos were beheaded and the remaining man was told to run. As he ran, they used him for rifle practice.