Bachrach Garage

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He went out on a work detail on May 11 to the Bachrach Garage which was part of the Callicoon Detail which had the POWs going back to Bataan and other parts of Luzon and collecting disabled vehicles. The larger group of POWs on the detail lived in a Methodist school at San Fernando Pampanga. The POWs picked up all the metal junk leftover from the battle. When they collected that, they began to recover all the vehicles that had been disabled before the surrender. To get the vehicles to Manila, where they were flattened before being loaded on ships – the POWs tied them together with ropes behind an operating vehicle. A POW sat in each vehicle and steered it as they were towed to San Fernando or Caloocan. Where other POWs worked as mechanics and attempted to get the vehicles running. If they did, the vehicles were sent to the Bachrach Garage for additional repairs. If they could not get the vehicles running, they were tied together again and taken to Manila as scrap metal. Before this was done, the POWs stripped the vehicles for parts.

While driving the vehicles, the POWs learned that if the brakes of any of the vehicles were quickly applied, it would stress the ropes and cause them to snap. The convoy then had to stop and retie the rope to the vehicle and continue the trip. The POWs quickly learned that the best time to do this was when the vehicles were approaching the town market of a barrio. If they timed it right, a rope would snap as they entered the market and the vehicles had to stop to reattach the rope. While this was done, the Filipinas came up to the POWs and gave them food without the guards interfering. Once the ropes were reattached, they were on their way.

During the spring of 1943, gasoline was being stolen that was used for operating vehicles used by the POWs. Eleven Filipinos were caught stealing gasoline by the Japanese. They were strung up by their thumbs with their toes barely touching the ground. The POWs were made to sit in front of the Filipinos on steps and the Japanese sat at tables. One Filipino was released and was beaten kicked, and cut. The more the Japanese drank, the worse it got. The POWs were forced to watch as pieces of wood were pushed into the men’s rectums. When he screamed the Japanese laughed. The Japanese did this to each of the Filipinos while the Americans were forced to watch. By morning, only three Filipinos were alive. Two of the Filipinos were beheaded and the remaining man was told to run. As he ran, they used him for rifle practice.

The scrap metal part of the detail ended in 1943, and the POWs were sent to Cabanatuan. The POWs at the Bachrach Garage where he was kept working. It appears that the POWs first lived in the garage building itself until near the end of 1943. At that time with the arrival of more Japanese troops, the POWs were told they had to build a barracks for themselves. To do this, the POWs were given sheet metal that came from warehouses or small stores in Manila. The barrack they built was 30 feet wide and 50 feet long, and along the sides was a bed shelf that came out ten feet from the wall and three feet above the ground. On the shelf were blankets and mosquito netting. The roof of the building was about 20 feet high and sheet metal closed off sheet metal baffles at each end that kept the rain out but allowed for ventilation but kept the rain out. In the center of the building was a table built with two-foot by eight-foot wooden planks where the POWs played cards, talked, ate, and drew. The only problem they had with living in it was that it got extremely cold.

In 1944, the men on the detail who had been tankers were not happy with the fact that the Japanese were pulling their disabled tanks from the jungle and having the POWs repair them and get them operational. According to Capt. Julien Goodman, the medical officer on the detail, the members of the tank group at the garage were not happy that their tanks were going to be used against American forces and wanted to sabotage the tanks. He also noted that the Japanese in charge of the detail did a thorough job of inspecting the POWs’ work and made it impossible to fix anything in a way it would break later. He also drove the tanks. Goodman stated that two POWs had the job of draining the oil and gasoline from the tanks once they were on the trucks that took them to the pier. While doing this they dropped fine sand into the engines that would ruin them at a later date making it difficult to trace back to them.

On September 13, one of the Japanese guards who was friendlier to the POWs told them that the next day they would be transferred to Bilibid Prison. He also told them that at some point they would be sent to Japan. The next day the detail ended and they were taken to Bilibid. It was on September 21, 1944, that Manila experienced its first American air raid when a formation of 80 planes bombed Clark Field and other locations. Some POWs believed the attack would stop the Japanese from sending them to Japan.

Around October 2, a list of names of POWs being sent to Japan was posted and his name was on it. The POWs were taken to Pier 7 in the Port Area of Manila. As they were boarding the Arisan Maru, at 4:00 P.M. on the 11th, when they heard air raid sirens. There was nothing on the ship that showed that it was carrying POWs but the Japanese kept putting the POWs into the ship’s hold. All but 200 of the POWs were put into hold #2 with the remaining POWs put into the forward hold. Along the sides of the second hold were shelves that served as bunks, but the bunks were so close together that a man could not lift himself up when he used one. Those standing had no room to lie down. The latrines for the prisoners were eight five-gallon cans, which the POWs could not use since they were packed in the hold so tightly. This resulted in the floor of the hold being covered with human waste.