Pvt. Raymond H. Schletterer
Born: 4 September 1913 - New York
Father: Raymond J. & Elizabeth Schletterer
Siblings: 2 sisters
Hometown: West Branch, Pennsylvania
Inducted: 20 January 1941 - Buffalo, New York
Training:
    - Fort Knox, Kentucky
        - welder
Units:
    - 19th Ordnance Battalion
        - trained alongside the 192nd Tank Battalion
        - August 1941 - maneuvers in Arkansas
            - Company A ordered to return to Ft. Knox
        - 17 August 1941
            - A Company reorganized as 17th Ordnance Company
                - received orders for overseas duty
Note:  The decision for this move - which had been made on August 15, 1941, at Ft. Knox, Kentucky - was the result of an event that took place in the summer of 1941.  A squadron of American fighters was flying over Lingayen Gulf, in the Philippines, when one of the pilots, who was flying at a lower altitude, noticed something odd.  He took his plane down and identified a flagged buoy in the water and saw another in the distance.  He came upon more buoys that lined up, in a straight line for 30 miles to the northwest, in the direction of an Japanese occupied island which was hundred of miles away.  The island had a large radio transmitter.  The squadron continued its flight plan south to Mariveles and returned to Clark Field.
     When the planes landed, it was too late to do anything that day.  The next day, when another squadron was sent to the area, the buoys had been picked up by a fishing boat - with a tarp on its deck - which was seen making its way to shore.  Since communication between the Air Corps and Navy was difficult, the boat escaped.  It was at that time the decision was made to build up the American military presence in the Philippines.
Overseas Duty:
    - traveled by train to Ft. Mason, San Francisco, California
        - Arrived: Thursday, 5 September 1941
        - ferried to Ft. McDowell, Angel Island on U.S.A.T. General Frank M. Coxe
            - given physicals and inoculations
            - men with medical conditions replaced
    - removed turrets from tanks of the 194th Tank Battalion
    - U.S.S. Calvin Coolidge
        - Boarded: San Francisco, California - Monday - 8 September 1941
        - Sailed: 9:00 P.M.
        - Arrived: Honolulu, Hawaii - Saturday - 13 September 1941 - 9:00 A.M.
            - soldiers given shore leave for the day
        - Sailed: same day - 5:00 P.M.
            - escorted by the heavy cruiser - U.S.S. Astoria and an unknown destroyer
                - smoke seen on horizon several times
                -  cruiser intercepted ships
                - ships from friendly countries
        - Tuesday - 16 September 1941 - ships crossed the International Dateline
            - date changed to - Thursday - 18 September 1941
        - Arrived: Manila, Philippine Islands - Friday - 26 September 1941
        - Disembark: 3:00 P.M.
            - 17th Ordnance remained behind to unload the tanks of the 194th Tank Battalion
                - reattached the turrets to the tanks
        - rode bus to Ft. Stotsenburg
        - lived in tents at Ft. Stotsenburg
           -barracks completed - 15 November 1941
Engagements:
    - Battle of Luzon
        - 8 December 1942 - 6 January 1942
    - Battle of Bataan
        - 7 January 1942 - 9 April 1942
            - serviced tanks of the 192nd & 194th Tank Battalions
Promoted: According to records, Schletterer rose in rank to T/4
    - rank also referred to as Tech Sergeant
Prisoner of War:
    - 9 April 1942
        - Death March
            - started march at Mariveles on the southern tip of Bataan
            - POWs ran past Japanese artillery firing on Corregidor
                - American Artillery returned fire
                    - knocked out three Japanese guns
            - escaped into jungle with Capt. Richard Kadel, Pvt. Frank Gyovai,
              Pvt. Hayden Lawrence,  Pvt. George Mogyorosi, and Pvt. James Boyd
Guerrilla: Captured
Prison Camps:
    - Philippines:
        - Cabanatuan
        - original name: Camp Pangaian
            - Philippine Army Base built for 91st Philippine Army Division
                - actually three camps
                -  POWs from Camp O'Donnell put in Camp 1
                    - Camp 2 was four miles away
                        - all POWs moved from there because of a lack of water
                        - later used for Naval POWs
                    - Camp 3 was six miles from Camp 2
                        - POWs from Corregidor and from hospitals sent there
            - work details sent out to cut wood for POW kitchens, plant rice, and farm
                - when POWs lined up for roll call, it was a common practice for Japanese guards, after the POWs lined up, to kick the POWs in
                  their shins with their hobnailed boots
                    - they also were frequently hit with a pick handle, for no reason, as they counted off
                - POWs on the rice planting detail were punished by having their faces pushed into the mud and stepped on
                - the POWs had to go into a shed to get the tools, as they came out, they were hit on their heads
                - if the guards on the detail decided the POW wasn't doing what he should be doing, he was beaten
                - many POWs on details were able to smuggle in medicine, food, and tobacco into the camp
            - to prevent escapes, the POWs set up patrols along the camp's fence
            - men who attempted to escape and caught were executed after being beaten
                - the other POWs were forced to watch the beatings
            - daily POW meal - 16 ounces of cooked rice, 4 ounces of vegetable oil, sweet potato or corn
        - hospitalized - Wednesday - 10 June 1942 - dysentery
        - Camp Hospital:
            - 30 Wards
                - each ward could hold 40 men
                    - frequently had 100 men in each
               - two tiers of bunks
                   - sickest POWs on bottom tier
               - each POW had a 2 foot by 6 foot area to lie in
            - Zero Ward
              - given name because it had been missed when counting wards
              - became ward where those who were going to die were sent
              - fenced off from other wards
                  - Japanese guards would not go near it
                 - POWs sent there had little to no chance of surviving
Hell Ship:
    - Nissyo Maru
        - Sailed: 14 July 1944 - Manila
        - Arrived: 17 July 1944 - Takao, Formosa
        - Sailed: 28 July 1944
        - Arrived: 6 August 1944 - Moji, Japan
POW Camps:
    - Japan
        - Fukuoka #3B
            - Work: POWs used as slave labor at Yawata Steel Mills
Died:
    - Tuesday -2 January 1945 - croup pneumonia
        - remains were cremated and given to the camp commandant
Buried:
    - 1948 - West Hills Cemetery - Galeton, Pennsylvania
        - Section:  3   Plot 3    Grave  34
Posthumously Promoted: Tec 4











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