S/Sgt. William M. McAuliffe


    S/Sgt. William M. McAuliffe was born on June 6, 1918, to William & Ella McAuliffe.  With his brother and five sisters, he was raised at 907 West McKinley Street, Janesville, Wisconsin.  In high school, he was a halfback on the Janesville High School football team and was a member of the Janesville High School graduating class of 1937.

    Right after graduating high school, William joined the Wisconsin National Guard's 32nd Tank Company.  In November 1940, he traveled to Fort Knox, Kentucky, when the company was federalized as A Company, 192nd Tank Battalion.  William was known for his "free spirit" and rose and dropped in rank repeatedly.
    A typical day for the soldiers started in 6:15 with reveille, but most of the soldiers were up before this since they wanted to wash and dress.  Breakfast was from 7:00 to 8:00 A.M., followed by calisthenics at 8:00 to 8:30.  Afterwards, the tankers went to various schools within the company.  The classes consisted of .30 and .50 caliber machine guns, pistol, map reading, care of personal equipment, military courtesy, and training in tactics.
    At 11:30 the soldiers stopped what they were doing and cleaned up for mess which was from noon to 1:00 P.M.  Afterwards, they attended the various schools which they had been assigned to on January 13, such as: mechanics, tank driving, radio operating.   At 4:30, the soldiers called it a day and returned to their barracks and put on dress uniforms and at five held retreat and followed by dinner at 5:30.  After dinner, they were off duty and lights were out at 9:00 P.M., but they did not have to turn in until 10:00 when Taps was played.

    William took part in maneuvers in Louisiana from September 1 through 30.  After the maneuvers, the battalion was ordered to Camp Polk, Louisiana, instead of returning to Ft. Knox as expected.  It was on the side of a hill that the soldiers were told they were being sent overseas.  Many of the men were allowed to go home to say their goodbyes.
    The reason for this move was because of an event that happened during the summer of 1941.  A squadron of American fighters was flying over Lingayen Gulf, on a routine patrol, when one of the pilots noticed something odd in the water.  He took his plane down and identified a flagged buoy in the water. and saw another flagged buoy in the distance.  The squadron flew toward it and came upon more buoys that lined up, in a straight line, for 30 miles to the northwest, in the direction of an Japanese occupied island, with a large radio transmitter, hundred of miles away.  The squadron continued its designated patrol and flew south to Mariveles before returning to Clark Field.  By the time the planes landed and reported what had been seen, it was too late to do anything that evening.
   The next morning, another squadron was sent to the area but the buoys had been picked up by a fishing boat which was seen making its way toward shore.  Since communication between and Air Corps and Navy was poor, the boat was not intercepted.  It was on August 15th that the decision was made to send the battalion to the Philippines.
    The battalion traveled by train routes to San Francisco, California, and were taken to Ft. McDowell on Angel Island by the ferry the U.S.A.T Frank M. Coxe.  On the island, they received inoculations and physicals from its medical detachment, and those members of the battalion who were found to have treatable medical conditions remained behind on the island and scheduled to rejoin the battalion at a later date, while other men were simply replaced.
   
    The 192nd was boarded onto the
U.S. A. T. Hugh L. Scott and sailed on Monday, October 27.  During this part of the trip, many of the tankers suffered from seasickness.  Once they recovered, they spent their time breaking down machine guns, cleaning weapons, and doing KP.  The ship arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii, on Sunday, November 2 and had a two day layover, so the soldiers were given shore leave so they could see the island.
    On Wednesday, November 5, the ship sailed for Guam but took a southerly route away from the main shipping lanes.  It was at this time it was joined by, the heavy cruiser, the U.S.S. Louisville and, another transport, the S. S. Calvin Coolidge .  Sunday night, November 9, the soldiers went to bed and when they awoke the next morning, it was Tuesday, November 11.  During the night, while they slept, the ships had crossed the International Date Line.
    During this part of the voyage, on Saturday, November 15, smoke from an unknown ship was seen on the horizon.  The Louisville revved up its engines, its bow came out of the water, and it shot off in the direction of the smoke.  It turned out the smoke was from a ship that belonged to a friendly country. During this part of the voyage, smoke from an unknown ship was seen on the horizon.  The cruiser that was escorting the two transports revved up its engines, its bow came out of the water, and it took off in the direction of the smoke.  It turned out that the unknown ship was from a friendly country.
    When they arrived at Guam on Sunday, November 16, the ships took on water, bananas, coconuts, and vegetables before sailing for Manila the next day.  At one point, the ships passed an island at night and did so in total blackout.  This for many of the soldiers was a sign that they were being sent into harm's way.  The ships entered Manila Bay, at 8:00 A.M., on Thursday, November 20, and docked at Pier 7 later that morning.  At 3:00 P.M., most of the soldiers were taken by bus to Ft. Stotsenburg.  Those who drove trucks drove them to the fort, while the maintenance section remained behind at the pier to unload the tanks.
    At the fort, they were greeted by Colonel Edward King, who apologized that they had to live in tents along the main road between the fort and Clark Airfield.  He made sure that they all received Thanksgiving Dinner before he went to have his own.  Ironically, November 20 was the date that the National Guard members of the battalion had expected to be released from federal service.
    For the next seventeen days the tankers worked to remove cosmoline from their weapons.  The grease was put on the weapons to protect them from rust while at sea.  They also loaded ammunition belts and did tank maintenance as they readied their tanks to take part in maneuvers.

    The morning of December 8, 1941, Capt. Walter Write informed his company that Pearl Harbor had been bombed by the Japanese.  The tanks were put on alert and took their positions around the airfield.  At 8:30 A.M., American took off to intercept any Japanese planes .  Sometime before noon, the alert was canceled and the planes landed and were lined up near the mess hall.  Their pilots went to lunch.

    The tankers were eating lunch when planes were seen approaching the airfield from the north at about 12:45.  Many of the tankers counted 54 planes.  The planes approached the airfield and watched hat was described as "raindrops" falling from the planes.

    When the Japanese were finished, there was not much left of the airfield.  Since the battalion's bivouac was near the main road between the fort and airfield, the soldiers watched as the dead, dying, and wounded were hauled to the hospital on bomb racks and trucks.  Anything that could carry the wounded was in use.  When the hospital filled, they watched the medics place the wounded under the building.  Many of these men had their arms and legs missing.  That night the soldiers had slept their last night in a bed.  For protection, they slept under their tanks or in them.
    Four days after the attack, on December 12, the company was sent to the Barrio of Dau so it would be close to a highway and railroad to guard against sabotage.  From there, the company was sent to join the other companies of the 192nd just south of the Agno River. 
    On December 23 and 24, the company was in the area of Urdaneta., where the tankers lost the company commander, Capt. Walter Write.  After he was buried, the tankers made an end run to get south of Agno River after the main bridge had been destroyed.  As they did this, they ran into Japanese resistance early in the evening but successfully crossed at the river in the Bayambang Province.
    From there, the company was sent to join the other companies of the 192nd just south of the Agno River.  There, the tanks, with A Company, 194th, held the position.  On December 25, the 192nd held the southern bank of the Agno River from Carmen to Tayung, with the tanks of the 194th holding the line on the Carmen-Alcala-Bautista Road.  The tanks held the position until 5:30 in the morning on December 27.

    The 192nd, and part of the 194th, fell back to form a new defensive line the night of December 27 and 28.  From there they fell back to the south bank of the BamBan River which they were suppose to hold for as long as possible.  The tanks were at Santo Tomas near Cabanatuan on December 28 and 29 serving as a rear guard against the Japanese.
    A Company was sent, in support of the 194th, to an area east of Pampanga.  It was there that they lost a tank platoon commander, Lt. William Read.  That night, o n a road east of Zaragoza, on December 30, the company was bivouacked for the night and posted sentries.  The sentries heard a noise on the road and woke the other tankers who grabbed Tommy-guns and manned the tanks' machine guns.  As they watched, a Japanese bicycle battalion rode into their bivouac.  When the last bicycle passed the tanks, the tankers opened up on them.  When they stopped firing, they had completely wiped out the bicycle battalion.  To leave the area, the tankers drove their tanks over the bodies.
    From January 2 to 4, the 192nd held the road open from San Fernando to Dinalupihan so the southern forces could escape.  It was also in January 1942, that the food ration was cut in half.  It was not too long after this was done that malaria, dysentery, and dengue fever began hitting the soldiers. January that the food rations were cut in half.  Not long after this, malaria, dysentery, and dengue fever soon    spread among the soldiers.
    The tanks often were the last units to disengage from the enemy and form a new defensive line as Americans and Filipino forces withdrew toward Bataan.  The night of January 7, A Company was awaiting orders to cross the last bridge into Bataan over the Culis Creek.  The engineers were ready to blow up the bridge, but the battalion's commanding officer, Lt. Col. Ted Wickord, ordered the engineers to wait until he had looked to see if they were anywhere in sight.  He found the company, asleep in their tanks, because they had not received the order to withdraw across the bridge.  After they had crossed, the bridge was destroyed.
   A Company was next sent, in support of the 194th, to an area east of Pampanga.  At Guagua, A Company, with units from the 11th Division, Philippine Army, attempted to make a counterattack against the Japanese.  Somehow, the tanks were mistaken by the Filipinos to be Japanese, and the 11th Division accurately used mortars on them.  The result was the loss of three tanks.  The company rejoined the 194th west of Guagua.
    The company, on January 5, was near the Gumain River attached to the 194th Tank Battalion.  It was evening and they believed they were in a relatively safe place.  Lt. Kenneth Bloomfield told his men to get some sleep.  Their sleep was interrupted by the sound of a gun shot.  The tankers had no idea that they were about to engage the Japanese who had lunched a major offensive.  There was a great deal of confusion and the battle lasted until 3:00 A.M., when the Japanese broke off the attack.  After this date, the company returned to the command of the 192nd.
   A Company was next sent, in support of the 194th, to an area east of Pampanga.  At Guagua, A Company, with units from the 11th Division, Philippine Army, attempted to make a counterattack against the Japanese.  Somehow, the tanks were mistaken by the Filipinos to be Japanese, and the 11th Division accurately used mortars on them.  The result was the loss of three tanks.  The company rejoined the 194th west of Guagua.
    A Company, on January 5, while attached to the 194th Tank Battalion, withdrew from the line.  Lt. Kenneth Bloomfield received orders to launch a counter-attack against the Japanese on a tail picked by Provisional Tank Group command. Bloomfield, while attempting to attack, radioed the tank group that the trail did not exit.
   It was evening and the tankers believed they were in a relatively safe place near Lubao along a dried up creek bed.  Bloomfield told his men to get some sleep.  Their sleep was interrupted by the sound of a gun shot at about 1:50 A.M.  The tankers had no idea that they were about to engage the Japanese who had lunched a major offensive across an open field wearing white shirts which made them easy targets.  There was a great deal of confusion and the battle lasted until 3:00 A.M., when the Japanese broke off the attack.  Within days of this action, the company returned to the command of the 192nd.
    A Company, was sent in support of the 194th, to an area east of Pampanga.  At Guagua, A Company with the 11th Infantry Division, Philippine Army, attempted to make a counterattack against the Japanese.  Somehow, the Filipinos mistook the tanks as Japanese and accurately used mortars on them knocking out three tanks.  A Company rejoined the 194th east of Guagua.
    The night of January 7, A Company was awaiting orders to cross the last bridge into Bataan over the Culis Creek.  The engineers were ready to blow up the bridge, but the battalion's commanding officer, Lt. Col. Ted Wickord, ordered the engineers to wait until he had looked to see if they were anywhere in sight.  He found the company, asleep in their tanks, because they had not received the order to withdraw across the bridge.  After they had crossed, the bridge was destroyed.    
    The next day the tanks received maintenance.  It was the first rest that the two tank battalions had since December 24.
    On January 28, the tank battalions were given the job of protecting the beaches.  The 192nd was assigned the coast line from Paden Point to Limay along Bataan's east coast.  The Japanese later admitted that the tanks guarding the beaches prevented them from attempting landings.

    The company also took part in the Battle of the Pockets - from January 23 to February 17 - to wipe out Japanese soldiers who had been trapped behind the main defensive line after a Japanese offensive was stopped and pushed pack to the original line of defense.  The tanks would enter the pocket one at a time to replace a tank in the pocket.  Another tank did not enter the pocket until a tank exited the pocket.  Doing this was so stressful that each tank company was rotated out and replaced by one that was being held in reserve.
    To exterminate the Japanese, two methods were used.  The first was to have three Filipino soldiers ride on the back of the tank.  As the tank went over a Japanese foxhole, the Filipinos dropped three hand grenades into the foxhole.  Since the grenades were from WWI, one out of three usually exploded.
    The other method to use to kill the Japanese was to park a tank with one track over the foxhole.  The driver gave the other track power resulting with the tank spinning around and grinding its way down into the foxhole.  The tankers slept upwind of their tanks.
    While the tanks were doing this job, the Japanese sent soldiers, with cans of gasoline, against the tanks.  These Japanese attempted to jump onto the tanks, pour gasoline into the vents on the back of the tanks, and set the tanks on fire.  If the tankers could not machine gun the Japanese before they got to a tank, the other tanks would shoot them as they stood on a tank.  The tankers did not like to do this because of what it did to the crew inside the tank.  When the bullets hit the tank, its rivets would pop and wound the men inside the tank.  It was for their performance during this battle that the 192nd Tank Battalion would receive one of its Distinguished Unit Citations.
    Since the stress on the crews was tremendous, the tanks rotated into the pocket one at a time.  A tank entered the pocket and the next tank waited for the tank that had been relieved to exit the pocket before it would enter.  This was repeated until all the tanks in the pocket were relieved. 
    During the battle, on February 3, 1942, near kilometer post 214,  while his tank was attempting to recover a tank that had been disabled and crew buried alive in the tank.  He was hit by shrapnel from a exploding landmine, under his tank, resulting in him having wounds on his legs, nose, and chest.  Of all the wounds he received the one on one of this legs would affect him the rest of his life.  He was the only member of his tank crew wounded and was awarded the Purple Heart.  He would also have a scar on his nose for the rest of his life.

    William was sent to Little Beguio Hospital, where he remained for two weeks after the surrender on April 9, 1942.  Since he was in the hospital, the Japanese allowed him to ride in a truck to Bilibid Prison.  The prison was used as a hospital, but there was no medicine to treat the sick and wounded.

    After Bilibid, William was sent to Cabanatuan where he was reunited with other members of A Company.  The camp had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division and previously was known as Camp Panagaian.
    The camp was actually three camps.  Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march where held.  Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed.  It later reopened and housed Naval POWs.  Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrender were taken.  In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp.  Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.
    Once in the camp, the POWs were allowed to run the camp.  The Japanese only entered if they had an issue they wanted to deal with.  To prevent escapes, the POWs set up a detail that patrolled the fence of the camp.  The reason this was done was that those who did escape and were caught, were tortured before being executed, while the other POWs were made to watch.  It is believed that no POW successfully escaped from the camp.
    In the camp, the Japanese instituted the "Blood Brother" rule.  If one man escaped the other nine men in his group would be executed.  POWs caught trying to escape were beaten.  Those who did escape and were caught, were tortured before being executed.  It is not known if any POW successfully escaped from the camp.
    The barracks in the camp were built to house 50 POWs, but most had between 60 to 120 POWs in them.  The POWs slept on bamboo slats, without mattresses, bedding, or mosquito netting.  Many quickly became ill.  The POWs were assigned to barracks which meant that the members of their group lived together, went out on work details together, and would be executed together since they were Blood Brothers.
    The POWs were sent out on work details one was to cut wood for the POW kitchens.  The two major details were the farm detail and the airfield detail which lasted for years.  A typical day on any detail lasted from 7:00 A.M. until  5:00 P.M.  The POWs on the farm detail would have to go to a shed each morning to get tools.  As they left the shed, the Japanese guards thought it was great fun to hit them over their heads.
    The detail was under the command of "Big Speedo" who spoke very little English.  When he wanted the POWs to work faster, he told the POWs " s peedo."   Although he was known to have a temper, the POWs thought he was fair.  Another guard was "Little Speedo" who was smaller and also used the word when he wanted the POWs to work faster.  The POWs also felt he was pretty fair in his treatment of them.  "Smiley" was another guard who always had a smile on his face but could not be trusted.  He was the meanest of the guards and beat men up for no reason.  He liked to hit the POWs with the club.  Any prisoner who he believed was not working hard enough got knocked over with it.  Any prisoner who he believed was not working hard enough got knocked over with it.  Each morning, after arriving at the farm, the POWs went into a tool shed to get their tools.  As they left the shed, the guards hit them on their heads.
    Other POWs worked in rice paddies.  While working in the fields, the favorite punishment given to the men in the rice paddies was to have their faces pushed into the mud and stepped on by a guard to drive their faces deeper into the mud.  Returning from a detail the POWs bought, or were given, medicine, food, and tobacco, which they somehow managed to get into the camp even though they were searched when they returned.
    Rice was the main food given to the POWs fed to them as "lugow" which meant "wet rice."  During their time in the camp, they received few vegetables and almost no fruit.  Once in awhile, they received bread.
    The camp hospital was known as "Zero Ward" because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks.  The sickest POWs were sent there to die.  The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves, and they would not go into the building.  There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building.  The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so the they could relieve themselves.  Most of those who entered the ward died.
    The POWs had the job of burying the dead.  To do this, they worked in teams of four men.  Each team carried a litter of four to six dead men to the cemetery where they were buried in graves containing 15 to 20 bodies.
     Sgt. Dale Lawton changed the dressing on William's leg daily.  By doing this, he prevented William from developing an infection even though pieces of shrapnel were still in his leg.

    On November 1, 1942, the Japanese drew 1500 POW names of men who were being sent to Japan.  When the names were drawn, the POWs had no idea what was happening.  Many came to the conclusion on their own that they were being sent to Japan.  At 3:00 A.M. on November 5, the POWs left the camp and marched to the Barrio of Cabanatuan.  Before they left the camp, each man was given his breakfast, to take with, which was a small issue of rice and what the Japanese termed "a large piece of meat."  The large piece of meat was two inches square and large next to a piece of meat they usually received at a meal.
    After they arrived at the barrio, a Japanese officer lectured the POWs before they boarded train cars.  98 POWs were put into each car which allowed them to position themselves so they could move around.  They remained on the train  all day and arrived at Manila at 5:00 P.M.  After they disembarked, they were marched to Pier 7 where they spent the night sleeping on a concrete floor in a building.
   The POWs boarded the Nagato Maru at 5:00 P.M. on November 6.  The POWs were pushed into the forward hold which the Japanese believed could hold 600 men without a problem.  In an attempt to get the POWs into the hold the Japanese beat them. When the Japanese realized that beating them was not working, they concluded that the hold could not hold 600 men.  It was at that time they lowered the number of men in the hold to somewhere between 550 and 560.  This meant that nine men had to share an area that was 4 feet, nine inches, by 6 feet, 2 inches.  All the holds on the ship were packed with men in the same manner.
    The POWs had barely enough room to sit down if their knees were drawn up under their chins.  The heat was also unbelievable, so the Japanese allowed small groups of POWs up on the deck at night in shifts.  The Nagato Maru sailed on November 7, 1942.
    The Japanese had set up two latrines for the POWs.  One was at the on each side of the ship's deck and since so many of the POWs had dysentery and diarrhea, it soon became obvious not going to work.  The sick who tried to use the latrines were beaten and kicked by the Japanese for making too much noise passing through the Japanese quarters.  When they reached the deck, they ended up waiting in line.
    For the extremely ill POWs, the Japanese sent down, into the hold, tubs for the extremely ill to use.  The sick crawled, rolled, and stumbled to reach the tubs.  Because the POWs were dehydrated, the POWs urinated frequently.  In addition, those with dysentery and diarrhea could not make it to the tubs which resulted in the POWs standing into several inches of human waste.  If they did try to reach the tubs, the men had step on the bodies of other POWs.
    The ship reached Takao, Formosa, on November 11.  While it was docked there, the POWs could not leave the holds.  The ship sailed on November 15, and arrived at Mako, Formosa the same day.  They remained in the holds with the fleas, lice, and roaches.  The ship sailed again on November 18.  During this part of the trip, the POWs felt the explosions from depth charges.
    The trip to Japan ended on November 24, when the ship reached Moji late in the day.  At 5:00 P.M. the next day they disembarked the ship.  As they disembarked, each POW received a chip of colored wood which determined what camp the POW was sent to.  In addition, once on shore, they were deloused, showered, and issued new uniforms.
    By ferry, the POWs were taken to Himoneski, Honshu, where they were loaded onto a train and took a long ride along the northern side of the Inland Sea to the Osaka-Kobe area, where the prisoners were divided into two groups according the color of wood they had. William and the other POWs were imprisoned at Osaka 3-D.  The POWs at Yodogawa worked in various steel mills.  The camp was located between Osaka and Kobe on the south bank of the Yodogawa River.  He would remain at this camp from November 26, 1942 until May 1945.

    Corporal punishment was common in the camp and given out for the slightest violation.  POWs who were caught with food were beaten and thrown into the guardhouse.  On one occasion while the POWs were working a POW stole an entire bowl of rice from a Japanese civilian.  To find out which of the 15 POWs involved did it, the Japanese forced a dirty rope down the throat of each man and caused him to vomit.  The man whose vomit contained the rice was the guilty POW.
    A common punishment was to have the POWs strip naked and make them kneel, in the cold, with a bamboo pole behind their knees to cut off circulation to their legs.  As they knelt, they were beaten until unconscious.  As they lay on the ground, water was thrown on them to revive them and the beating resumed.  This was repeated many times.
    The largest collective punishment took place after the Japanese discovered their were POWs selling their rubber sole shoes to Japanese civilians.  All the POWs were lined up, called to attention, and made to strip naked.  They then were made to kneel, with bamboo poles behind their knees for hours until those guilty of trading their shoes confessed.
    One POW, who wanted to end the punishment, said that he was the guilty man.  The fact was he did this to end the punishment and had not traded his shoes.  The man was beaten on his head and shoulders with slippers, belts, fists, and leather heels.  He was knocked to the ground and was kicked in his stomach and other parts of his body.  When he passed out, water was thrown on him to revive him and the beating continued until he passed out again.  Again he was revived with water and beaten until he passed out.  Afterwards, his hands were tied behind his back, to a rope, and he was strung up, on his tiptoes, all night.

    It was at Yodogawa that William received the only Red Cross package he received as a POW.  In the package were vitamin pills.  William ate 500 of these pills in two days.  His reason for doing this was that they were sweet and sweet tasting things were almost none existent in the POW's diet.  On October 15, 1944, Bill was caught smuggling bean paste into the camp and was beaten.

    In early May 1945, American bombers attacked the industrial complex where William worked.  The bombings were so bad that the camp was totally destroyed by fire.  What made the attacks worse was that the POW barracks were located in the middle of the industrial area.  On May 18, 1945 the POWs were transferred to Oeyama an island seaport.

    William and the other prisoners unloaded food, coal and coke from ships for a nickel refinery at the Miyazu docks.  The food they unloaded was bound for the Japanese army, so the POWs would steal a couple of pocketful of beans everyday.  In addition, the POWs worked inside the Hachidate Branch Nickel Refinery.  With a pick and shovel, he and the other POW's had to extract ore from the mine.  When they loaded a car, they next had to push it to the railroad track that ran past the mine.  The prisoners had to work in all types of weather and in snow as deep as six feet.  They also worked at the nickel mine almost six miles from the camp.  It is also known that one group of POWs did carpentry work.

    The Japanese enforced collective discipline in the camp.  Sometimes work groups would be punished, other times larger groups of POWs were punished, and there were times all the POWs were punished.  On one occasion a work group of twelve POWs were made to stand at attention for two hours before they were forced to swallow rope which caused them to throw up.  This was done because the Japanese believed they had stolen rice.  When none was found, the Japanese fed the POWs rice and sent them to their barracks.

    On December 6, 1944, the entire camp was placed on half rations because one POW had violated a rule.  The entire camp again was put on half rations on January 7.  At various times a portion of the POWs were put on half rations.  80 to 90 POWs were put on half rations on March 7, 1944, while 60 POWs were put on half rations on April 7 and made to stand at attention in a heavy rain.

    Beatings were a common event and the POWs were beaten, punched, slapped, hit with sticks, and kicked.  During the winter, they were made to stand at attention in sleet and snow for long periods of time.  The POWs were also forced to run as far as two and one half miles. When one or a few POWs were being punished it was not uncommon for the other POWs to have to hit the POWs.  They also were forced to kneel and hold a heavy object, like a log, over their heads.  One POW, who took the blame for breaking into a warehouse was forced to squat with a pole behind his knees and hold a log over his head until he passed out.
    Since a certain number of POWs had to report for work everyday, illness was not an excuse for getting out of working.  The camp POW doctor's recommendation that POWs not work, because they were too ill, was overruled by a Japanese medical corpsman, and men suffering from dysentery or beriberi were sent to work.
     Red Cross packages were withheld from the POWs and the Japanese raided them for canned meats, canned milk, cigarettes, and chocolate.  These items were seen by the POWs in the camp offices. The clothing and shoes sent for POW use was also appropriated by the Japanese.
    On July 30, 1945, B-29s  bombed Miyazu.  Since the bombing run ran over the camp, two  POWs were killed.  About two weeks later, a massive air raid on the town took place and lasted all night until it ended about midday. 

    Even at this point in the war the Japanese weighed the prisoners.  To William, this was silly since all the POWs were underweight.  When he was freed, William weighed 104 pounds.

    William was liberated in September, 1945, after spending 41 months as a Prisoner of War.  He returned to the Philippine Islands for medical treatment.  He was boarded onto the Simon Bolivar which arrived at San Francisco on October 21, 1945.   The former POWs were taken to Letterman General Hospital in San Francisco and later was sent to Mayo Veterans Administration Hospital in Galesburg, Illinois.  There, he underwent surgery to remove shrapnel and scar tissue from his leg.  He also had skin grafted onto the leg. 

    William married and raised a family.  He also remained in the army and did a tour of duty in Vietnam.  He was discharged on May 23, 1966.  William M. McAuliffe passed away on February 8, 1977, in Las Cruces, New Mexico.  He was buried at Ft. Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas.  


 

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