Kramp_C

 

Sgt. Carl Matthew Kramp


    Sgt. Carl Matthew Kramp was born September 14, 1920, in Pequot Lakes, Minnesota.  He was the son of Charles and Grace Kramp.  He had two brothers and a sister.  In 1940, his family was living in Lake Edwards Township, Crow Wing County, Minnesota.
    On May 11, 1940, while working as a farmhand, Carl joined the Minnesota National Guard's 34th Tank Company in Brainerd.  The same day he enlisted, he went with the company to Camp Ripley.  The next day, he fired a machine gun from a moving tank. 
    On February 10, 1941, the company was designated A Company, 194th Tank Battalion and sent to Fort Lewis, Washington for training.  There, the company was joined by B Company, from Saint Joseph, Missouri, and C Company from Salinas, California.
    After six months of training, during which Carl qualified as a tank driver.  He was a member of a tank crew which included Sgt. Dave Karlson,  Pvt. James Bogart, radio operator, and Pvt. Carson Hopkins, assistant tank driver.  The battalion was given orders for duty overseas.
    On August 15, 1941, the 194th received orders, from Ft. Knox, Kentucky, for duty in the Philippines because of an event that happened during the summer.  A squadron of American fighters was flying over Lingayen Gulf when one of the pilots, who was flying at a lower altitude, noticed something odd in the water.  He took his plane down and identified a flagged buoy in the water and saw another in the distance.  He followed the buoys which lined up, in a straight line for 30 miles to the northwest, in the direction of an Japanese occupied island which was hundred of miles away.  The island had a large radio transmitter on it.  The squadron continued its flight plan and flew south to Mariveles before returning to Clark Field.  By the time the planes landed that evening, it was too late to do anything that day.
    The next morning, another squadron was sent to the area and found that the buoys had been picked up by a fishing boat which was seen making its way toward shore.  Since communication between and Air Corps and Navy was poor, the boat was not intercepted.  It was at that time the decision was made to build up the American military presence in the Philippines.
    In September 1941, the battalion, minus B Company, traveled by train to Ft. Mason in San Francisco, California. From there, on the U.S.A.T. General Frank M. Coxe, they were ferried to  Fort McDowell on Angel Island and given physicals and inoculated.  Men who had medical conditions were held back and replaced.
    The tankers boarded the S.S. President Calvin Coolidge on September 8th at 3:00 P.M. and sailed at 9:00 P.M. for the Philippine Islands.  To get the tanks to fit in the ship's holds, the turrets had serial numbers spray painted on them and were removed from the tanks.  They arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii, on Saturday, September 13th at 7:00 A.M., and most of the soldiers were allowed off ship to see the island but had to be back on board before the ship sailed at 5:00 P.M.
    After leaving Hawaii, the ship took a southerly route away from the main shipping lanes.  It was at this time that it was joined by the U.S.S. Astoria, a heavy cruiser, and an unknown destroyer that were its escorts.  During this part of the trip, on several occasions, smoke was seen on the horizon, and the Astoria took off in the direction of the smoke.  Each time it was found that the smoke was from a ship belonging to a friendly country.
    The ships crossed the International Dateline on September 16 and the date changed to September 18.  They entered Manila Bay at 7:00 A.M. and reached Manila several hours later.  The soldiers disembarked at 3:00 P.M., and were driven on buses to Clark Field.  The maintenance section of the battalion and members of 17th Ordnance remained at the dock to unload the battalion's tanks and reattach the turrets.
    On December 1st, the tankers were ordered to the perimeter of Clark Field to guard against Japanese paratroopers.  Two members of each tank and half-track crew remained with their vehicles at all times and received their meals from food trucks.
    The morning of December 8, 1941, at 8:30, the planes of the the Army Air Corps took off and filled the sky.  At noon the planes landed to be refueled, line up in a straight line, and the pilots went to lunch in the mess hall.  At 12:45 in the afternoon, just ten hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Danny lived through the Japanese attack on Clark Airfield.
    When the Japanese were finished, there was not much left of the airfield.  The soldiers watched as the dead, dying, and wounded were hauled to the hospital on bomb racks, trucks, and anything that could carry the wounded was in use.  When the hospital filled, they watched the medics place the wounded under the building.  Many of these men had their arms and legs missing.
    That night, most men slept under their tanks since it was safer than sleeping in their tents.  They had no idea that they had slept their last night in a bed.  They lived through two more attacks on December 10th.  The night of the 12th/13th, the battalion was ordered to bivouac south of San Fernando near the Calumpit Bridge.  Attempting to move the battalion at night was a nightmare, and they finally arrived at their new bivouac at 6:00 A.M. on December 13th.
    The battalion received 15 Bren Gun carriers on the 15th, and gave some to the 26th Cavalry, Philippine Scouts.  They used the carriers to test the ground to see if it was solid enough to support tanks.  They next were ordered to support the 71st Division in the area of Rosario on the 22nd, but the division's commanding officer ordered them out of the area, since he believed they would interfere with operations.
    The night of the 22nd/23rd, the battalions were operating north of the Agno River when it they found that the bridge they were suppose to use had been bombed.  On December 23rd and 24th, the battalion was in the area of Urdaneta and found the bridge they were going to use to cross the Agno River was destroyed.  The tankers made an end run to get south of river and ran into Japanese resistance early in the evening, but they successfully crossed at the river in the Bayambang Province.
    Later on the 24th, the battalions formed a defensive line along the southern bank of the Agno River with the tanks of the 192nd holding the Agno River from Carmen to Tayung, and the 194th holding the line on the Carmen-Alcala-Bautista Road.  The tanks held the position until 5:30 in the morning on December 27th when they withdrew, following the Philippine Army, to the Tarlec-Cabanatuan Line and was near Santo Tomas and Cabanatuan on the 28th and 29th.
    The tank battalions next covered the withdrawal of the Philippine Army at the Pampanga River.  The battalion's tanks were on both sides of the on December 31st at the Calumpit Bridge.
    On January 1st, conflicting orders, about who was in command, were received by the defenders who were attempting to stop the Japanese advance down Route 5 and allowing the Southern Luzon Forces to withdraw toward Bataan.  General Wainwright was unaware of the orders, since they came from Gen. MacArthur's chief of staff.
    Because of the orders, there was confusion among the Filipinos and American forces defending the bridge over the Pampanga River about withdrawing from the bridge with half of the defenders withdrawing.  Due to the efforts of the Self Propelled Mounts, the 71st Field Artillery, and a frenzied attack by the 192nd Tank Battalion the Japanese were halted.  From January 2nd to 4th, the 192nd held the road open from San Fernando to Dinalupihan so the southern forces could escape.
    At 2:30 A.M., on January 6th, the Japanese attacked at Remlus in force using smoke which was an attempt by the Japanese to destroy the tank battalions. That night the tanks withdrew into the peninsula with the 192nd holding its position so that the 194th Tank Battalion could leap frog past it, cross the bridge, and then cover the 192nd's withdraw over the bridge.  The 192nd was the last American unit to enter Bataan.
    The night of January 7th, the tank battalions were covering the withdrawal of all troops around Hermosa.  Around 6:00 A.M., before the bridge had been destroyed by the engineers, the 192nd crossed the bridge.
    The next day, the battalion was between Culo and Hermosa and assigned a road to enter Bataan on which was worse than having no road.  The half-tracks kept throwing their rubber tracks and members of 17th Ordnance assigned to each battalion had to re-track them in dangerous situations.  After daylight, Japanese artillery fire was landing all around the tanks.
    The next day, a composite tank company was formed under the command of Capt. Donald Haines, B Co., 192nd.  Its job was to protect the East Coast Road north of Hermosa open and to stop Japanese tanks attempting to use it to overrun the next defensive line that was forming. While in this position, the tanks were under constant enemy artillery fire.  The rest of the tanks were ordered to bivouac south of the Abucay-Hacienda Road.
    When word came that a bridge was going to be blow, all the tanks were ordered out of the area, which included the composite company.  This could have resulted in a catastrophe, but the Japanese did not take advantage of the situation.
    The tanks bivouacked south of the Pilar-Bagac Road and about two kilometers from the East Coast Road.  It had almost been one month since the tank crews had a rest and the tanks had maintenance work done on them by 17th Ordnance.  It was also on this day that the tank platoons were reduced to three tanks per tank platoon.  The men rested and the tanks received the required maintenance.  Most of the tank tracks had worn down to bare metal and the radial engines long past their 400 hour overhauls.
    It was at this time the tank battalions received these orders which came from Gen. Weaver:  "Tanks will execute maximum delay, staying in position and firing at visible enemy until further delay will jeopardize withdrawal.  If a tank is immobilized, it will be fought until the close approach of the enemy, then destroyed; the crew previously taking positions outside and continuing to fight with the salvaged and personal weapons. Considerations of personal safety and expediency will not interfere with accomplishing the greatest possible delay."
    The battalions were sent to cover the junctions of the Back Road and East Road with the Abucay-Heicienda Road on January 25.  While holding the position, the 45th Infantry, Philippine Scouts, fought its way to the position at 3:00 A.M.  One platoon was sent to the front of the the column of trucks which were loading the troops.  The tanks provided heavy fire so that the infantry could withdraw and inflicted heavy losses on the Japanese.
    Later on January 25, both the 192nd and 194th held a defensive line on the Bakanga-Cardre-BaniBani Roads until the withdraw was completed at midnight.  They held the position until the night of January 26/27, when they dropped back to a new defensive line roughly along the Pilar-Bagac Roads.  When ordered to withdraw to the new line, the 192nd found that the bridge at Balanga, that they were suppose to use had been destroyed by enemy fire.  To withdraw, they had to use secondary roads to get around the barrio and tanks were still straggling in at noon.
    The tank battalions, on January 28, were given the job of protecting the beaches, while the battalion's half-tracks were used to patrol the roads.  The Japanese later admitted that the tanks guarding the beaches prevented them from attempting landings.
    The tank battalions, on their own, took up the job of protecting the airfields at Cabcaban, Bataan, and Mariveles, since Japanese paratroopers were known to be available.  The tanks and half-tracks were well hidden in the jungle around the airfields and different plans were in place to be used against Japanese forces.  There was only one major alert in March when 73 Japanese planes came over.
    It was at this time the tank battalions received these orders which came from Gen. Weaver:  "Tanks will execute maximum delay, staying in position and firing at visible enemy until further delay will jeopardize withdrawal.  If a tank is immobilized, it will be fought until the close approach of the enemy, then destroyed; the crew previously taking positions outside and continuing to fight with the salvaged and personal weapons. Considerations of personal safety and expediency will not interfere with accomplishing the greatest possible delay."
    In February, the tanks had the job of protecting beaches so that the Japanese could not land troops on them.  At the same time, the tank battalions took it upon themselves to protect three airfields from Japanese paratroopers. 
    In late March 1942, two of the tanks of the battalion had gotten stuck in mud.  While the crews were attempting to recover the tanks, the Japanese entered the area.  Lt. Col. Miller, with cigar in his mouth, ordered his tank crews, at point blank range, to open up with everything they had.  He also called in artillery fire.  Miller ran from tank to tank directing his tanks fire.  When they ceased fire, they had wiped out the Japanese regiment. 
    At some point during March, Carl got an infection in his hand and developed boils.  He was sent to a military hospital on April 5 or 6.  It was while he was hospitalized that Bataan was surrendered.  He remained in the hospital and did not take part in the death march.  One thing he remembered about his time in the hospital was that the Japanese placed their artillery around the buildings using them as a shield as they fired on Corregidor.
    About the same time that Corregidor surrendered, Carl was driven by truck to Bilibid.  When the POWs were being transferred to Cabanatuan, he stole a three inch thick cotton mattress from Bilibid and went out on a work detail to Cabcaben on May 19, 1942.  The POWs collected scrap metal to be sent to Japan.  When the detail ended, he was sent to Cabanatuan and assigned to Barracks 2, Group 3, Company 2. 
    On August 8, 1942, Carl came down with diphtheria and put into the camp hospital.  The doctor on duty gave him a shot and told him, "You're a lucky kid."  He asked the doctor what he meant and the doctor told him he had received the last shot of serum for diphtheria.  The other POWs admitted after him, with diphtheria, all died.  He was discharged on September 24, 1942. 
    On December 12, 1942, Carl was selected to go out on a work detail to Las Pinas.  The POWs were forced to build runways on this detail with picks and shovels.  Carl remained on this detail until 1943, when he and the other POWs were returned to Cabanatuan.
    During Carl's second stay in the camp, he worked in the camp's farm.  The POWs  grew the food, but they were not allowed to eat the crops.  The food was given to the Japanese.  The Japanese searched the POWs, but somehow they still managed to smuggle food into the camp.  His family officially learned that he was a POW on January 29, 1943.
    On February 3, 1943, Carl was admitted to the camp hospital.  How long he was in the hospital and why he was admitted was not indicated in camp records.  No date was given for his being discharged, but he was readmitted on February 17th.
    In July 1943, Carl was selected for shipment to Japan.  He and almost 500 other POWs were taken to Manila.  On July 22, 1943, the POWs were boarded onto the Clyde Maru.  The ship sailed on July 23 and arrived at Santa Cruz, Zambales, the same day.  There, manganese ore was loaded onto the ship.  After three days, the ship sailed.  During this part of the trip 100 POWs were allowed on the deck at a time.  The ship arrived at Takao, Formosa, on July 28.  The ship sailed again on August 5 at 8:00AM.  It arrived at Moji, Japan, on August 7, 1943. 
    From Moji on August 8, he and the other prisoners were boarded onto a train.  The train took two days to arrive at Omuta, Kyushu.  They were marched eighteen miles to Tobata, Japan and Fukuoka #3.  Those POWs too ill to march were taken by truck to the camp.  The prisoners in the camp worked at Yawata Steel Mills. 
    The POWs worked at the Yawata Steel Mills doing manual labor.  The work was to shovel iron ore and rebuild the ovens.  The POWs were sent into the ovens to clean out the debris.  Since the ovens were hot, because the Japanese would not let them cool off, the POWs worked faster on this detail.  Many of the products from the mill helped the Japanese war effort.  If an air raid took place while the POWs were at the mill, they were put into railway cars and the train was pulled into a tunnel.  Those POWs further from the tunnel took cover in two air raid shelters.
    Although medical supplies for the POWs were sent to the camp by the Red Cross the Japanese commandant would not give the American medical staff the medicine that was in the packages.  Any surgery in the camp had to be performed with crude medical tools even though the Red Cross had sent the proper surgical tools.  To meet quotas for workers, the sick POWs were required to work even if it meant they could possibly die from doing it.
    Three days a month, the POWs were allowed to exchange their worn out clothing for new clothing, but a Japanese guard beat POWs attempting to exchange their clothing.  The POWs went without clothing to avoid the beatings which resulted in men developing pneumonia and dying.
    The POWs were beaten daily with fists and sticks for violating camp rules, and the guards often required them to stand at attention, in the cold, while standing water.  During the winter, they often had water thrown on them.  There were two brigs in the camp which had as many as 20 POWs in them at a time. 
    While he was in the camp, on on September 23, 1944, he sent home a POW postcard to his parents.  In it he said, "Hoping to see you all soon."  It should be mentioned that while he was a POW, his parents had moved to Everett, Washington.  Carl would remain in the camp until the end of the war. 
    During Carl's time as a POW, he was ill with diphtheria, yellow jaundice, and Dengue Fever.  At the time of liberation, on September 6, 1945, he weighed 85 pounds.  He was returned to the Philippine Islands for medical treatment.
   Boarding the S.S. Klipfontein, he sailed from Manila on October 9, 1945, arriving at Seattle, Washington, on October 28, 1945, and was hospitalized at Madagan General Hospital, Ft. Lewis, Washington.  He was discharged on March 15, 1946.
    Carl returned to Minnesota after the war.  He married Harriet Brown in Lake Hubert, Minnesota, in the same wedding ceremony in which Sgt. Alpheus Brown married.  He would later move to Everett, Washington, and north Seattle.  He was the father of a son and daughter and was employed as a postal worker for 27 years retiring in September, 1980.  He later lived in Mason Lake, Washington.
    Carl M. Kamp died on June 19, 2004, in Shelton, Washington.  He was buried at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent, Washington, in Section I, Row D, Site 20.

 

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