HallLD
 
Pvt. Luther Dean Hall
Born: 26 July 1920 - Monmouth, Oregon
Parents: Luther J. Hall & Millie Clark-Hall
    - father died in 1923
    - mother remarried - Lewis Rake - 1925
Siblings: 1 half-sister
Hometown: Portland, Oregon
Enlisted:
    - U.S. Army
        - 16 September 1940 - Portland, Oregon
Training:
    - Fort Lewis, Washington
Units:
    - 194th Tank Battalion
    - Headquarters - II Corps
        - transferred during war
Overseas Duty:

    - Ship: U.S.S. President Coolidge
        - Boarded: Monday - 8 September 1941 - 3:00 P.M.
        - Sailed: 9:00 P.M. - same day
        - Arrived: Honolulu, Hawaii - Saturday - 13 September 1941 - 7:00 A.M.
        - Sailed: 5:00 P.M. - same day
        - Arrived: Manila - Friday - 26 September 1941
            - disembark ship - 3:00 P.M.
            - taken by bus to Fort Stostenburg
    - Philippines
        - lived in tents until barracks completed - 15 November 1941   
Engagements:
    - Battle of Luzon
        - 8 December 1941 - 6 January 1942
    - Battle of Bataan
        - 7 January 1942 - 9 April 1942
Tank battalion commanders received this order, "You will make plans, to be communicated to company commanders only, and be prepared to destroy within one hour after receipt by radio, or other means, of the word 'CRASH', all tanks and combat vehicles, arms, ammunition, gas, and radios: reserving sufficient trucks to close to rear echelons as soon as accomplished."
            - 10:30 P.M. - Gen. King announced that further resistance would result in the massacre of
              6000 sick or wounded troops and 40000 civilians
            - less than 25% of his troops were healthy enough to continue fighting
            - he estimated they could hold out one more day
            - sent his staff officers to negotiate the surrender of Bataan
            - 11:40 P.M. - ammunition dumps blown up
Prisoner of War:
    - 9 April 1942
        - started march from Mariveles
            - halted and rested for an hour
             - resume march
                - at times slipped on remains of dead who had been killed by Japanese shelling
        - reached Limay
        - marched through Abucay and Samal
        - reached Orani
            - herded into a fenced in area and ordered to lie down
            - in morning found they had been lying in human waste
            - latrine in one corner was crawling with maggots
        - North of Hermosa the POWs reached pavement
            - made march easier
        - POWs march through Layac and Lurao
            - rains - POWs drank as much as they could
        - reached San Fernando
            - POWs put in groups of 200 to be fed
                - one POW sent to get a box of rice for each group
                - pottery jars of water given out the same way
       - POWs
            - formed detachments of 100 men and marched to train station
            - POWs put into small wooden boxcars used to haul sugarcane
                - each boxcar could hold eight horses or forty men
                - 100 POWs packed into each car
                - POWs who died remained standing
        - Capas - dead fell to floor as living left boxcars
            - as POWs formed ranks, Filipinos threw sugarcane to POWs
            - also gave them water
            - POWs walked last 8 kilometers to Camp O'Donnell
POW Camps:
    - Philippines:
        - Camp O'Donnell
            - unfinished Filipino Army training camp
            - Japanese put camp into use as POW camp
            - only one water spigot for the entire camp
            - as many as 50 POWs died each day
            - Japanese opened a new camp to lower death rate 
        - Cabanatuan

            - July 1944 - selected for transport to Japan
            - 15 July 1944
                - 25 to 30 trucks arrived at camp to transport POWs to Manila 
                    - POWs left at 8:00 P.M.
    - Bilibid Prison
        - arrived at 2:00 A.M. - 16 July 1944
        - only food they received was rotten sweet potatoes
Hell Ship:

    - Nissyo Maru
        - Friday - 16 July 1944 - POWs left prison at 7:00 A.M.
        - Boarded ship: same day
            - Japanese attempted to put all the POWs in one hold
            - when they couldn't, they put 900 the POWs in the forward hold
            - 600 POWs held in rear hold
        - Sailed: Manila - same day
            - dropped anchor at breakwater - 17 July 1944 - 23 July 1944
            - POWs were not fed or given water for over a day and a half after being put in
              the ship's hold
            - POWs fed rice and vegetables twice a day and received two canteen cups of
               water each day
            - 23 July 1944 - 8:00 A.M. - ship moved to area off Corregidor and dropped
              anchor
        - Sailed: Monday - 24 July 1944
            - part of a 13 ship convoy
            - some POWs cut the throats of other POWs and drank their blood
            - convoy attacked by American submarines
                - four of the thirteen ships in the convoy were sunk
                - a torpedo hit the ship but did not explode
        - Arrived: Takao, Formosa - Friday - 28 July 1944 - 9:00 A.M.
        - Sailed: same day - 7:00 P.M.
            - 30 July 1944 - 2 August 1944 - sailed through storm
        - Arrived: Moji, Japan - Thursday - 3 August 1944 - midnight
            - POWs disembarked and taken to a pier - Friday - 4 August 1944 - 8:00 A.M.
                - POWs put into a movie theater
                - later divided into 200 men detachments and sent to different POW camps
            - taken by train to POW camps along train lines
            - POWs arrived at Fukuoka #23 - Saturday - 5 August 1944
  

POW Camp:
    - Japan:
        - Fukuoka #23
            - Work: POWs worked in coal mine

            - POWs worked in two shifts
                - A Group worked in mine during the day
                - B Group worked in mine at night

                - the longer they were in the camp the less food they received     
Liberated:

     - 15 August 1945
         - POWs who worked nights told those who worked the day shift the war was over
         - many of the POWs refused to believe it even though they saw the Japanese
           civilians crying
         - it was only after the work bell did not ring the next morning that they knew
           the was over
    - 16 August 1945 -10:00 A.M. - camp commandant told POWs they did not
            have to work, but they could not leave the camp
    - 24 August 1945
        - Japanese gave POWs canvas and paint and told them to make large "POW"
           letters on roofs of buildings
    - 28 August 1945 - two POWs dropped 55 gallon drums of food and clothing to
       the POWs
         - planes returned almost daily and dropped food
    - 15 September 1945 - Americans entered camp
        - POWs processed and boarded trucks provided by the Japanese
        - taken to train station and rode a train to Nagasaki
            - saw the damage done by the atomic bomb
            - POWs deloused and given new clothes
            - boarded U.S.S. Marathon and taken to Okinawa
            - from Okinawa they were flown to Manila
Promoted: Staff Sergeant
Discharged: 17 June 1946
Married:  Virginia M. Chipendale
Children: 2 daughters, 1 son
Residence: Portland, Oregon
Died: 31 October 1966 - Multnomah, Oregon
Buried:
    - Willamette National Cemetery - Portland, Oregon
        - Section;  S    Site:  1709

 

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