Pfc. Charles Albert Carter
    Pfc. Charles A. Carter was born on September 9, 1919, in Franklin County, Ohio, to Minor & Belle Carter. 
His family of six sisters and two brothers were raised at Star Yard on Portsmouth, Ohio.  It is known his father died in the 1930s. 
In 1940, his family was living at 376 Kellogg Street in Columbus, Ohio.  To help support the family, he finished eighth grade and went to work as a laborer at a rock quarry. 
    Charles was inducted into the U.S. Army on March 28, 1941, in Columbus.  He was sent to Fort Knox, Kentucky, for basic training.  After basic training, he was sent to Camp Polk, Louisiana, where he was assigned to the 753rd Tank Battalion.  The battalion had been sent to Camp Polk from Fort Benning, Georgia.  Maneuvers were taking place at the camp, but the 753rd did not take part of them.
    After the maneuvers the 192nd Tank Battalion expected to return to Ft. Knox.  Instead, they were kept at Camp Polk and not given a reason.  It was on the side of a hill that they learned that they were being sent overseas.  Men 29 years old or older were given the opportunity to resign from federal service.  Replacements for these men came from the 753rd Tank Battalion.  One of those replacements was Charles, who was assigned to B Company.

    The battalion traveled by train to San Francisco.  By the ferry, the U.S.A.T. General Frank M. Coxe, they were taken to Ft. McDowell on Angel Island, where they received inoculations and physicals from the battalion's medical detachment.  Those members of the battalion who were found to have treatable medical conditions remained behind on the island and scheduled to join the battalion at a later date.  Other men were simply replaced.
    The 192nd was boarded onto the U.S.A.T. Gen. Hugh L. Scott and sailed on Monday, October 27.  During this part of the trip, many tankers had seasickness, but once they recovered they spent much of the time training in breaking down machine guns, cleaning weapons, and doing KP.   The ship arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii, on Sunday, November 2 and had a two day layover, so the soldiers were given shore leave so they could see the island.
    On Wednesday, November 5, the ship sailed for Guam but took a southerly route away from the main shipping lanes.  It was at this time it was joined by, the heavy cruiser, the U.S.S. Louisville and, another transport, the S.S. President Calvin Coolidge.  Sunday night, November 9, the soldiers went to bed and when they awoke the next morning, it was Tuesday, November 11.  During the night, while they slept, the ships had crossed the International Dateline.  On Saturday, November 15, smoke from an unknown ship was seen on the horizon.  The Louisville revved up its engines, its bow came out of the water, and it shot off in the direction of the smoke.  It turned out the smoke was from a ship that belonged to a friendly country.
    When they arrived at Guam on Sunday, November 16, the ships took on water, bananas, coconuts, and vegetables before sailing for Manila the next day.  At one point, the ships passed an island at night and did so in total blackout.  This for many of the soldiers was a sign that they were being sent into harm's way.  The ships entered Manila Bay, at 8:00 A.M., on Thursday, November 20, and docked at Pier 7 later that morning.  At 3:00 P.M., most of the soldiers were taken by bus to Ft. Stotsenburg.  Those who drove trucks drove them to the fort, while the maintenance section remained behind at the pier to unload the tanks.
   At the fort, they were greeted by Gen. Edward P. King, who apologized they had to live in tents along the main road between the fort and Clark Airfield.  He made sure that they had what they needed and received Thanksgiving Dinner before he went to have his own dinner.  Ironically, November 20 was the date that the National Guard members of the battalion had expected to be released from federal service.
    The members of the battalion pitched the tents in an open field halfway between the Clark Field Administration Building and Fort Stotsenburg.  The tents were set up in two rows and five men were assigned to each tent.  There were two supply tents and meals were provided by food trucks stationed at the end of the rows of tents.
    For the next seventeen days the tankers worked to remove cosmoline from their weapons.  The grease was put on the weapons to protect them from rust while at sea.  They also loaded ammunition belts and did tank maintenance as they prepared to take part in maneuvers with the 194th Tank Battalion.

    On December 1, the tanks were ordered to the perimeter of Clark Field to guard against paratroopers.  Two crew members had to be with their tank at all times and were fed from food trucks.  The morning of December 8, 1941, the tankers were ordered to the perimeter of Clark Airfield.  They had received word of the Japanese attack on Clark Airfield.  As they sat in their tanks and half-tracks they watched as American planes filled the sky.  At noon, the planes landed and the pilots went to lunch.  At 12:45, the tankers watched as planes approached the airfield from the north.  When bombs began exploding on the runways, they knew the planes were Japanese.
    At 12:45 in the afternoon on December 8, 1941, just ten hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he lived through the Japanese attack on Clark Field.  That morning, they had been awakened to the news that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor just hours earlier.  He and the other tankers were eating lunch when planes approached the airfield from the north.  At first, they thought the planes were American.  They then saw what looked like rain drops falling from the planes.  It was only when bombs began exploding on the runways that the tankers knew the planes were Japanese.  The company remained at Clark Field for the next two weeks.
    The tank battalion received orders on December 21 that it was to proceed north to Lingayen Gulf.   Because of logistics problems, the B and C Companies soon ran low on gas.  When they reached Rosario, there was only enough for one tank platoon, from B Company, to proceed north to support the 26th Cavalry.
    On December 23 and 24, the battalion was in the area of Urdaneta, where the bridge they were going to use to cross the Agno River was destroyed.  The tankers made an end run to get south of river and ran into Japanese resistance early in the evening but successfully crossed at the river in the Bayambang Province.
    On December 25, the tanks of the battalion held the southern bank of the Agno River from Carmen to Tayung, with the tanks of the 194th holding the line on the Carmen-Alcala-Bautista Road. The tanks held the position until 5:30 in the morning on December 27.
    The tankers were at Santo Tomas near Cabanatuan on December 27, and at San Isidro south of Cabanatuan on December 28 and 29.  On January 1, conflicting orders about who was in command and withdrawing from the bridge were received by the defenders who were attempting to stop the Japanese advance down Route 5.  Doing this would allow the Southern Luzon Forces to be cut off from Bataan.  General Wainwright was unaware of the orders since they came from Gen. MacArthur's chief of staff.
    Because of the orders, there was confusion among the Filipinos and American forces defending the bridges over the Pampanga River.  Due to the efforts of the Self-Propelled Mounts, the 71st Field Artillery, and a frenzied attack by the 192nd Tank Battalion the Japanese were halted.  From January 2 to 4, the 192nd held the road open from San Fernando to Dinalupihan so the southern forces could escape.
    At 2:30 A.M., on January 5/6, the Japanese attacked at Remlus in force using smoke which was an attempt by the Japanese to destroy the tank battalions. at 5:00A.M., the Japanese withdrew having suffered heavy casualties.  That, January 6/7, night the tanks withdrew into the peninsula with the 192nd holding its position so that the 194th Tank Battalion could leap frog past it, cross the bridge, and then cover the 192nd's withdraw over the bridge.  The 192nd was the last American unit to enter Bataan.  The bridge was destroyed after they crossed it.
    The next day, the battalion was between Culo and Hermosa and assigned a road to enter Bataan on which was worse than having no road.  The half-tracks kept throwing their rubber tracks and members of 17th Ordnance assigned to each battalion had to re-track them in dangerous situations.  After daylight, Japanese artillery fire was landing all around the tanks.
    The next day, a composite tank company was formed under the command of Capt. Donald Haines, B Co., 192nd.  Its job was to protect the East Coast Road north of Hermosa open and to stop Japanese tanks attempting to use it to overrun the next defensive line that was forming. While in this position, the tanks were under constant enemy artillery fire.  The rest of the tanks were ordered to bivouac south of the Abucay-Hacienda Road.
    When word came that a bridge was going to be blow, all the tanks were ordered out of the area, which included the composite company.  This could have resulted in a catastrophe, but the Japanese did not take advantage of the situation.
    The tanks bivouacked south of the Pilar-Bagac Road and about two kilometers from the East Coast Road.  It had almost been one month since the tank crews had a rest and the tanks had maintenance work done on them by 17th Ordnance.  It was also on this day that the tank platoons were reduced to three tanks per tank platoon.  The men rested and the tanks received the required maintenance.  Most of the tank tracks had worn down to bare metal and the radial engines long past their 400 hour overhauls.
    It was at this time the tank battalions received these orders which came from Gen. Weaver:  "Tanks will execute maximum delay, staying in position and firing at visible enemy until further delay will jeopardize withdrawal.  If a tank is immobilized, it will be fought until the close approach of the enemy, then destroyed; the crew previously taking positions outside and continuing to fight with the salvaged and personal weapons. Considerations of personal safety and expediency will not interfere with accomplishing the greatest possible delay."
    The battalions were sent to cover the junctions of the Back Road and East Road with the Abucay-Heicienda Road on January 25.  While holding the position, the 45th Infantry, Philippine Scouts, fought its way to the position at 3:00 A.M.  One platoon was sent to the front of the the column of trucks which were loading the troops.  The tanks provided heavy fire so that the infantry could withdraw and inflicted heavy losses on the Japanese.
    Later on January 25, both the 192nd and 194th held a defensive line on the Bakanga-Cardre-BaniBani Roads until the withdraw was completed at midnight.  They held the position until the night of January 26th/27th, when they dropped back to a new defensive line roughly along the Pilar-Bagac Roads.  When ordered to withdraw to the new line, the 192nd found that the bridge at Balanga, that they were suppose to use had been destroyed by enemy fire.  To withdraw, they had to use secondary roads to get around the barrio and tanks were still straggling in at noon.
    The tank battalions, on January 28, were given the job of protecting the beaches.  The 192nd was assigned the coast line from Paden Point to Limay along Bataan's east coast, while the battalion's half-tracks were used to patrol the roads.  The Japanese later admitted that the tanks guarding the beaches prevented them from attempting landings.
    Companies A & C were ordered to the west coast of Bataan while B Company - which was held in reserve - and 17th Ordnance held the southern shore of Bataan.  The tankers were awake all night and attempted to sleep under the jungle canopy, during the day, which protected them from being spotted by Japanese reconnaissance planes.  During the night, they were kept busy with repeated threats both on and off shore.
    On one occasion, a member of the company, who had gotten frustrated by being awakened by the planes, had his half-track pulled out onto the beach and took pot shots at the plane.  He missed the plane, but twenty minutes later, Japanese planes appeared over the location and dropped bombs that exploded in the tree tops.  Three members of the company were killed.
    The tank battalions, on their own, took up the job of protecting the airfields at Cabcaban, Bataan, and Mariveles, since Japanese paratroopers were known to be available.  The tanks and half-tracks were well hidden in the jungle around the airfields and different plans were in place to be used against Japanese forces.  There was only one major alert in March when 73 Japanese planes came over.
    The company also took part in the Battle of the Pockets - from January 23 to February 17 - to wipe out Japanese soldiers who had been trapped behind the main defensive line after a Japanese offensive was stopped and pushed pack to the original line of defense.  The tanks would enter the pocket one at a time to replace a tank in the pocket.  Another tank did not enter the pocket until a tank exited the pocket.  Doing this was so stressful that each tank company was rotated out and replaced by one that was being held in reserve.
    To exterminate the Japanese, two methods were used.  The first was to have three Filipino soldiers ride on the back of the tank.  As the tank went over a Japanese foxhole, the Filipinos dropped three hand grenades into the foxhole.  Since the grenades were from WWI, one out of three usually exploded.
    The other method to use to kill the Japanese was to park a tank with one track over the foxhole.  The driver gave the other track power resulting with the tank spinning around and grinding its way down into the foxhole.  The tankers slept upwind of their tanks.
    While the tanks were doing this job, the Japanese sent soldiers, with cans of gasoline, against the tanks.  These Japanese attempted to jump onto the tanks, pour gasoline into the vents on the back of the tanks, and set the tanks on fire.  If the tankers could not machine gun the Japanese before they got to a tank, the other tanks would shoot them as they stood on a tank.  The tankers did not like to do this because of what it did to the crew inside the tank.  When the bullets hit the tank, its rivets would pop and wound the men inside the tank.  It was for their performance during this battle that the 192nd Tank Battalion would receive one of its Distinguished Unit Citations.
    Since the stress on the crews was tremendous, the tanks rotated into the pocket one at a time.  A tank entered the pocket and the next tank waited for the tank that had been relieved to exit the pocket before it would enter.  This was repeated until all the tanks in the pocket were relieved.
    What made this job so hard was that the Japanese dug "spider holes" among the roots the trees.  Because of this situation, the Americans could not get a good shot at the Japanese. 
    The tankers, from A, B, and C Companies, were able to clear the pockets.  But before this was done, one C Company tank which had gone beyond the American perimeter was disabled and the tank just sat there.  When the sun came up the next day, the tank was still sitting there.  During the night, its crew was buried alive, inside the tank, by the Japanese.  When the Japanese had been wiped out, the tank was turned upside down to remove the dirt and recover the bodies of the crew.  The tank was put back into use.
     At the same time the company took part in the Battle of the Points on the west coast of Bataan.  The Japanese landed troops but ended up trapped.  One was the Lapay-Longoskawayan points from January 23 to 29, the Quinawan-Aglaloma points from January 22 to February 8, and the Sililam-Anyasan points from January 27 to February 13.  The defenders successfully eliminated the points by driving their tanks along the Japanese defensive line and firing their machine guns.  The 45th Infantry, Philippine Scouts followed the tanks eliminating any resistance and driving the Japanese Marines over the edge of the cliffs where they hid in caves.  The tanks fired into the caves killing or forcing them out of them into the sea.
    The soldiers were hungry and began to eat everything they could get their hands on to eat.  The Carabao were tough but if they were cooked long enough they could be eaten.  They also began to eat horse meat provided by the 26th U. S. Cavalry.  To make things worse, the soldiers' rations were cut in half again on March 1, 1942.  This meant that they only ate two meals a day.
    The Japanese also were dropping surrender leaflets with a scantly clad blond on them.  The Japanese would have been more successful at getting the Americans to surrender if the picture had been hamburger, since the men were so hungry that they most likely would have surrendered for a good meal.
    In March, the amount of gasoline was reduced to 15 gallons a day for all vehicles except the tanks.  This would later be dropped to ten gallons a day.  At the same time, food rations were cut in half again.  Also at this time, Gen. Weaver suggested to Gen. Wainwright that a platoon of tanks be sent to Corregidor.
    On April 3, 1942, the Japanese launched a attack supported by artillery and aircraft.  A large force of Japanese troops came over Mount Samat and descended down the south face of the volcano.  This attack wiped out two divisions of defenders and left a large area of the defensive line open to the Japanese.  On April 7, the 57th Infantry, Philippine Scouts, supported by tanks, attempted to restore the line, but Japanese infiltrators prevented this from happening.  During this action, one tank was knocked out but the remaining tanks successfully withdrew.  C Company, 194th, was attached to the 192nd and had only seven tanks left.
    It was the evening of April 8 that Gen. Edward P. King decided that further resistance was futile, since approximately 25% of his men were healthy enough to fight, and he estimated they would last one more day.  In addition, he had over 6,000 troops who sick or wounded and 40,000 civilians who he feared would be massacred.  At 10:30 that night, he sent his staff officers to negotiate surrender terms.
    Tank battalion commanders received this order:  "You will make plans, to be communicated to company commanders only, and be prepared to destroy within one hour after receipt by radio, or other means, of the word 'CRASH', all tanks and combat vehicles, arms, ammunition, gas, and radios: reserving sufficient trucks to close to rear echelons as soon as accomplished."       
    The morning of April 9, 1942, the members of B Company circled their tanks.  Each tank fired one armor piercing shell into the engine of the tank in front of it.  The tankers next opened up the gasoline valves and dropped hand grenades into the turrets.  The next morning at 7:00 A.M. they became Prisoners of War.
    The members of C Company made their way to Mariveles at the southern tip of Bataan.  It was from this barrio that the tankers started what they simply called,  "the march."   The POWs made their way north from Mariveles.  The first five miles of the march were uphill.  At one point, the members of the company had to run past Japanese artillery firing on Corregidor.  They received little water and little food.  When they reached San Fernando, they were put into a bull pen.  In one corner of the bull pen was a trench the POWs were suppose to use as a washroom.  The surface of the trench was alive with maggots.  How long they remained in the bull pen is not known.
    The Japanese ordered the POWs to form ranks.  They were marched to the train stationed and packed into small wooden boxcars used to haul sugarcane.  Each car could hold forty men or eight horses.  The Japanese  packed 100 POWs into each car.  Those who died remained standing since there was no place for them to fall.  At Capas, the living left the cars and the dead fell to the floors. 
    The POWs walked the last eight kilometers to Camp O'Donnell which was an unfinished Filipino Army Training Base.  The Japanese pressed the camp into use as a POW camp on April 1, 1942.  When they arrived at the camp, the Japanese confiscated any extra clothing that the POWs had and refused to return it to them.  They searched the POWs and if a man was found to have Japanese money on them, they were taken to the guardhouse.  Over the next several days, gunshots were heard to the southeast of the camp.  These POWs had been executed for looting.
    There was only one water faucet in the camp, and the prisoners stood in line from two to eight hours waiting for a drink.  The Japanese guards at the faucet would turn it off for no reason and the next man in line would stand as long as four hours waiting for it to be turned on again.  This situation improved when a second faucet was added.
    There was no water for washing clothes, so the POWs would throw out their clothing when it had been soiled.  In addition, water for cooking had to be carried three miles from a river to the camp and mess kits could not be washed.  The slit trenches in the camp were inadequate and were soon overflowing since most of the POWs had dysentery.  The result was that flies were everywhere in the camp including the POW kitchens and in the food.
    The camp hospital had no soap, water, or disinfectant.  When the ranking American doctor at the camp wrote a letter to the camp commandant, Capt. Yohio Tsuneyoshi, asking for medical supplies, he was told never to write another letter.
    The Archbishop of Manila sent a truckload of medical supplies to the camp, the Japanese commandant refused to allow the truck into the camp.  When the Japanese Red Cross sent medical supplies the camp the Japanese took 95% of the supplies for their own use.
    The POWs in the camp hospital lay on the floor elbow to elbow and only one of the six medic assigned to care for 50 sick POWs was healthy enough to care for them.  When a representative of the Philippine Red Cross stated they could supply a 150 bed hospital for the camp, he was slapped in the face by a Japanese lieutenant.
    Each morning, the bodies of the dead were found all over the camp and were carried to the hospital and placed underneath it.  The bodies lay there for two or three days before they were buried in the camp cemetery by other POWs who were suffering from dysentery and/or malaria.  To clean the ground under the hospital, the ground was scraped and lime was spread over it.  The bodies of the dead were placed in the area, and the area they had been laying was scrapped and lime was spread over it.
    Work details were sent out on a daily basis.  Each day, the American doctors gave a list of names to the Japanese of the POWs who were healthier enough to work.  If the quota of POWs needed to work could not be met, the Japanese put those POWs who were sick, but could walk, to work.  The death rate among the POWs reached 50 men dying a day.  The Japanese finally acknowledge that they had to do something, so the opened a new POW camp at Cabanatuan.
    On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas.  There, the were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards.  At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan.  The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup.  From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division and was formerly known at Camp Panagaian.
    To prevent escapes, the POWs set up a detail that patrolled the fence of the camp.  The reason this was done was that those who did escape and were caught, were tortured before being executed, while the other POWs were made to watch.  It is believed that no POW successfully escaped from the camp.
    Meals on a daily basis consisted of 16 ounces of cooked rice, 4 ounces of vegetable oil, and sweet potato or corn.  Since the POWs were underfed, many became ill and died of malnutrition.
    The POWs were sent out on work details to cut wood for the POW kitchens.  Other POWs worked in rice paddies.  Each morning, as the POWs stood at attention and roll call was taken, the Japanese guards hit them across their heads.  After arriving at the farm, the POWs went into a tool shed to get their tools.  As they left the shed, the guards hit them on their heads.  While working in the fields, the favorite punishment given to the men in the rice paddies was to have their faces pushed into the mud and stepped on by a guard to drive their faces deeper into the mud.  Returning from a detail the POWs bought, or were given, medicine, food, and tobacco, which they somehow managed to get into the camp even though they were searched when they returned.
    The barracks used by the POWs were built to hold 50 POWs, but the Japanese put from 60 to 120 POWs in each one.  There no shower facilities and the POWs slept on  bamboo strips.  In addition no bedding, covers, or mosquito netting was provided which resulted in many becoming ill.
    The camp hospital was made up of 30 wards.  Zero ward had been missed when the wards were being counted so it was given the name of "Zero Ward."  The ward became the place were POWs who were going to die were sent.  The Japanese were so terrified by it, that they put a fence up around it and would not go near the building.  Most of the POWs who died there died because their bodies were too malnourished to fight the diseases they had.
    Charles went out on a work detail in December 1942, to Ft. McKinley and collected junk leftover from the battle.  When the detail started, the POWs were issued coconut fiber hats and shoes.  Both these items did not last long on the detail.  Later, the hats were replaced by Red Cross hats and new shoes in the Red Cross packages the POWs received in November 1943.  Although clothing was repeatedly issued, there was never enough given out.
    The POWs lived in the barracks of the 45th Infantry Division, Philippine Scouts.  Since there was limited room, the men slept shoulder to shoulder on sawale floor mats and in ten men mosquito nets issued by the Japanese.  The POWs washed their clothes in buckets.  The meals for the POWs were cooked in four halves of 50 gallon oil barrows. They remained there until they were done cleaning up junk that had been left from the fighting.
    The next place the POWs worked was at Nielsen Field.  The work started on January 29, 1943, and for the first six weeks the POWs marched 8 kilometers from Ft. McKinley to the airfield.  They were later moved to Camp Nielsen where they lived in Nipa huts that were 150 feet long by 20 feet wide which had been built for them and were taken to the airfield by truck.  There, the POWs worked at constructing a northeast to southwest runway and building revetments.
    At first tents were provided for protection against the sun and rain, but many were stolen by the Filipinos and the rest deteriorated until they were useless.  There was plenty of water for drinking and adequate latrines were provided.  The POWs were divided into two groups.  One group worked for a hour while the other rested.  This was later reduced to two 15 minute breaks in the morning and afternoon.   Later, the number of breaks was increased to three 15 minute breaks in the morning and afternoon.
    The POWs worked from 8:00 A.M. to noon and from 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.  The POWs were divided into two groups. While one group was working for an hour, the other group rested.  The work was hard and called for the POWs to remove dirt and rock to the area where the runway was being built.  Wheelbarrows were used at first, which turned out to be ineffective and resulted in many POWs being physically unable to work.  The POWs received one day off a week.
    Small mining cars were brought in, and the POWs filled the cars with dirt and rocks before they were pushed by five men down a track from 200 feet to 500 feet long.  When they reached the area where the material was wanted, they emptied the car.
    On March 28, the Japanese instituted the "speedup program" to get the work done quicker.  The POWs did not know if it was because they had fallen behind in the construction of the runway, or if it was because the war was going badly for the Japanese, and they needed the runway finished.  This lasted until July 4 when it was ended.  When the work was finished on the runway, the POWs were moved, on October 25, 1943, to Camp Murphy #1 where they were housed in the former headquarters building.
    In October 1943, the POWs' food ration was cut and many became ill.  Sick call took place in the evening until 8:00 P.M. when roll call took place.  A Japanese private determined who was sick enough not to work.  The American doctor later was allowed to decide which POWs could not work.  Often Japanese doctors went over his selections and determined which POWs would remain in the camp hospital.  To the American medical staff, it seemed that the Japanese doctors sent men to work because they wanted to save face.
    One of the biggest problems the POWs, and Japanese, were having at this time was what was known as "foot pain," which was a form of dry beriberi.  If a man in the hospital showed signs of it, one Japanese hit them in the head with a broom handle.  The Japanese slowly came to respect the American medical staff's selections and stopped questioning them.
    The POWs once again worked on constructing a runway.  This time it was a north/south runway  through a rice paddy at Zablan Field.  When the work stated the rice paddies were filled with water and it was the rainy season.  In addition to picks and shovels, the POWs also operated diesel compressors, rollers, and drills.  Each day they walked about three quarters of a mile to where the construction was taking place.  For lunch, they returned to their barracks.  There was never enough water for the POWs when working, so men attempted to bring it with them in bottles if they did not have canteens.
    No latrines were provided, so the POWs relieved themselves anywhere they wanted at the work site.  The spread of disease was prevented because of the sunshine, and frequent rains.  This problem was never adequately dealt with.
    The Japanese built five new barracks at Camp Murphy and the POWs were moved to them on April 28, 1944.  This new housing was given the name Camp Murphy 2.  The original POW compound was located about 250 yards away.  A total of 200 POWs were housed in each of the barracks.  The entire POW compound was 350 by 400 feet.
    On January 4, 1944, the work day changed and the POWs now worked 7 A.M. to 11:00 A.M.  To avoid the heat of  the midday, the POWs started again at 1:30 and worked until 5:00 P.M.  Their one day off a week was cut to half of a day off.  Sometimes, they received a half a day off for some Japanese holiday.  Their work hours were changed a second time with their afternoon hours being extended until 6:00 P.M.
    The POWs worked for one hour and were given one hour off.   Since they were divided into two groups, one group would always be working.  There job was to build a runway through rice paddies which meant they had to move dirt and rock to build it.  To do this, they had mining cars which they pushed down 300 to 500 feet down track to where the dirt was to be dumped.  The POWs work day started at 7:00 A.M. and they worked until 11: A.M. when they stopped.  At 1:30 P.M., they started again and worked until 5:00 P.M.  On May 28, 1944, an additional hour was added to their work day, and they worked until 6:00 P.M.
    The POWs were moved to Camp Murphy 2 on January 29, 1944, which was 200 yards from their old quarters.  On March 1, 1944, the POWs witnessed the execution of Pvt. George Garrett by the camp commander, Lt. Yoshi Koshi, for planning to escape.  According to the POWs, Garrett and two other men had planned an escape and were informed on by the Navy Chief Signalman, Harold Hirschberg, who the POWs considered a collaborator.  According to the POWs, Hirschberg told Garrett, who he had, had a fight with,  "You'll never leave this camp alive."   The POWs stated that over several days, the Japanese starved Garrett, beat him, and finally placed a garden hose in Garrett's mouth until his stomach was filled with water.  The Japanese then stood on his abdomen which caused his death three days later. 
    The Japanese decided that work needed to be done at another airfield close by, so POWs were sent there to work.  The airfield was 4 kilometers from Camp Murphy, and they were taken to it in trucks.  They also received their meals at the airfield. 
    Later in 1944, while the POWs were building runways, the airfield was attacked by American planes.  For safety, they hid in the revetments as the planes strafed and bombed the field.  As they watched the events, they enjoyed watching the damage the planes were doing.  It was not long after witnessing the attack that he and the other POWs were sent to Bilibid Prison.
    In July 1944, Charles' name appeared on a list for POWs being sent to Japan.  On July 17, the POWs were taken to Pier 7 in Manila and boarded onto the Nissyo Maru.  The Japanese attempted to pack the entire POW detachment into the number one hold.  When they realized that they couldn't, they opened the number two hold.  The POWs were fed at 9:00 P.M.  The next day, the ship moved further out in the harbor and dropped anchor.  The POWs did not  receive water for over a day.  The ship remained outside the breakwater for a week before it moved again and anchored off Corregidor.
    Once the 21 ships of Convoy HI 68 were gathered in Manila Harbor, the ships sailed on July 24.  The next day the ships were spotted by an American wolf pack.  Inside the holds, the POWs used buckets as toilets. The Japanese also set up wooden toilets that hung over the side of the ship.
    At 12:22 P.M., the freighters were fired on by the submarines.  The torpedoes missed but the Japanese bow knew that there were submarines in the area and began dropping depth charges. The submarines disengaged from the convoy and waited until after dark to resume the attack. When they did they sunk several of the ships.  The POWs on Nissyo Maru saw the flames from one of the ships, a tanker, go over the hatch, which was uncovered, of the hold.
    On July 27, the convoy reached Takao, Formosa, at 1:00 P.M.  Sugar was loaded in the lower part of the number two hold.   The ships sailed the next day and the convoy arrived at Moji, Japan, on August 3rd at 4:00 P.M.
    The POWs disembarked and were deloused.  The detachment of POWs Charles was in was boarded onto a train and taken to Osaka #3-B or Oeyama Camp.  The POWs in the camp worked in a nickel mine owned by Nippon Yakin Kogyo and at the Hachidate Branch Nickel Refinery.  Most of the work was simple labor.  Other POWs were required to walk nearly six miles to another nickel mine.  POWs were also assigned to do stevedore work at Miyazu Harbor.
    The prisoners unloaded food, coal, and coke from ships for a nickel refinery at the Miyazu docks.  The food they unloaded was bound for the Japanese army, so the POWs would steal a couple of pocketful of beans everyday.  In addition, the POWs worked inside the Hachidate Branch Nickel Refinery.  With a pick and shovel, he and the other POW's had to extract ore from the mine.  When they loaded a car, they next had to push it to the railroad track that ran past the mine.  The prisoners had to work in all types of weather and in snow as deep as six feet.  They also worked at the nickel mine almost six miles from the camp.  It is also known one group of POWs did carpentry work.
    The Japanese enforced collective discipline in the camp.  Sometimes work groups would be punished, other times larger groups of POWs were punished, and there were times all the POWs were punished.  On one occasion a work group of twelve POWs were made to stand at attention for two hours before they were forced to swallow rope which caused them to throw up.  This was done because the Japanese believed they had stolen rice.  When none was found, the Japanese fed the POWs rice and sent them to their barracks.
    On December 6, 1944, the entire camp was placed on half rations because one POW had violated a rule.  The entire camp again was put on half rations on January 7.  At various times a portion of the POWs were put on half rations.  80 to 90 POWs were put on half rations on March 7, 1944, while 60 POWs were put on half rations on April 7 and made to stand at attention in a heavy rain.
    Beatings were a common event and the POWs were beaten, punched, slapped, hit with sticks, and kicked.  During the winter, they were made to stand at attention in sleet and snow for long periods of time.  The POWs were also forced to run as far as two and one half miles. When one or a few POWs were being punished it was not uncommon for the other POWs to have to hit the POWs.  They also were forced to kneel and hold a heavy object, like a log, over their heads.  One POW, who took the blame for breaking into a warehouse was forced to squat with a pole behind his knees and hold a log over his head until he passed out.
    Since a certain number of POWs had to report for work everyday, illness was not an excuse for getting out of working.  The camp POW doctor's recommendation that POWs not work, because they were too ill, was overruled by a Japanese medical corpsman, and men suffering from dysentery or beriberi were sent to work.
     Red Cross packages were withheld from the POWs and the Japanese raided them for canned meats, canned milk, cigarettes, and chocolate.  These items were seen by the POWs in the camp offices. The clothing and shoes sent for POW use was also appropriated by the Japanese.
    The attacks by American B-29s became more frequent in 1945.  On July 30th, B-29s bombed Miyazu doing heavy damage.   Two weeks later the bombers returned bombing all night ending about noon the next day.  A guard who once told the POWs they would executed if the war ended told them the war was over.
    Charles was liberated on September 2, 1945, and returned to the Philippines to receive medical treatment.  He was returned to the United States on the U.S.S. Storm King, at San Francisco, on October 15, 1945.  He married Eva Margaret Albright and the couple became the parents of two daughters, two sons, and resided in Zanesville, Ohio.
    Charles A. Carter passed away on April 19, 1965, and was buried at the Memorial Park Cemetery in Zanesville.       



 

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