Choate_J

 

Pvt. James Louis Choate


Born: 3 December 1918 - Hopkins County, Kentucky

Mother: Artie Stringfellow-Choate

Nickname: "Piggy"

Siblings: 3 brothers, 1 sister

Step-siblings: 2 sisters, 1 brother

Home: South McEven Avenue -  Earlington, Kentucky

Married: Margaret Almon

Children: 1 son - Lonnie

Occupation: coal miner & automobile salesman

Inducted: 

    - U. S. Army

        - 22 January 1941

Training: 

    - Fort Knox, Kentucky

        - tank driver

    - Camp Polk, Louisiana

        - D Company took southern rail route to San Francisco, California
        - taken by ferry to Angel Island
        - physicals and inoculations given to soldiers

Overseas Duty:
    - Boarded: San Francisco - Monday - 27 October 1941
    - Sailed: same day
    - Arrived: Honolulu, Hawaii - Sunday - 2 November 1942
        -soldiers given shore leaves to see the sights
    - Sailed: Tuesday- 4 November 1942
    -Arrived: Guam - not known
        - ships took on water, bananas, coconuts, and vegetables
    - Sailed: next day
    - Arrived: Manila, Philippine Islands - Thursday - 20 November 1941
        - disembarked three hours after arrival
        - rode buses to Ft. Stotsenburg
        - greeted by General Edward King
            - apologize soldiers had to live in tents
            - made sure soldiers had their Thanksgiving Dinners before he had his

Engagements:

    - Battle of Luzon 

        - 8 December 1941 - 6 January 1942

    - Battle of Bataan

        - 7 January 1942 - 9 April 1942 

Prisoner of War: 

    - 9 April 1941

         - Death March

            - Mariveles - POWs started march at southern tip of Bataan
            - POWs ran past Japanese artillery firing at Corregidor
                - Americans on Corregidor returned fire
            - San Fernando - POWs put into small wooden boxcars
                - each boxcar could hold eight horses or forty men
                - 100 POWs packed into each car
                - POWs who died remained standing
            - Capas - dead fell to floor as living left boxcars
            - POWs walked last ten miles to Camp O'Donnell

POW Camps: 

    - Philippine Islands: 

        - Camp O'Donnell

            - unfinished Filipino training base
            - Japanese put camp into use as POW Camp
            - only one water spigot for entire camp
            - as many as 50 POWs died each day
            - Japanese opened new POW camp to lower death rate
 

        - Cabanatuan

            - hospitalized - 13 August 1942

                - discharged - no date given
            - hospitalized - 11 October 1942
                - discharged - no date given

        - Las Pinas work detail - July 1943

            - Work: built runways with picks and shovels

            - on alternating days the POWs farmed

            - may have sent back to Cabanatuan due to illness
            - Japanese treatment of POWs was brutal
                - many POWs were killed
                - became ill and was sent to Bilibid and later Cabanatuan

        - Palawan Island

            - POWs built runways at an airfield

Died:

    - Thursday - 14 December 1944 - burnt to death - Palawan Island

Buried:

    - 14 February 1952

         - Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery - St. Louis, Missouri

            - Plot:  85  Row: 0   Grave:  14 - 66 


 

 


 



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